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Album review

Costar

Exit (Popfiction)

Costar have a mixed, and rather curious, background. Part-English, part-Norwegian, they discovered their lead guitarist during a lock-in at their local pub, while their drummer used to be in Pulp-era Britpop also-rans Rialto. If these curious roots have you hoping for an experimental mish-mash of The Wannadies, Oasis and Jarvis Cocker, then you’d better think […]



Bright Eyes

Cassadaga (Saddle Creek)

One of Conor Oberst’s less questionable releases, yes, but the Saddle Creek sovereign’s latest collection of songs lacks that indefinable essence of Oberst that has graced previous albums, questionable or not.



Shiny Toy Guns

We Are Pilots (Mercury)

Don’t let the fact that they’ve supported My Chemical Romance and Fall Out Boy put you off ` Shiny Toy Guns are NOT an emo band. In fact, emotional engagement seems low on their priorities as far as the music is concerned



Various Artists

Psychedelica Volume 2 (Northern Star)

I can’t find any information about this compilation except for the tracklisting, but it’s pretty obvious what kind of music you’ll find on this CD and all from modern day bands worldwide.



The Vores

Moment of Uncertainty (Double Duke)

A bit of a late review this one seems. It was released in 2004! Which makes sense really because it was then the world was really enjoying a post-punk resurgence which has since died down a little.



Betika

Halflove (Pawthorn)

Let’s be honest, none of us really know why we’re here. In the grand scheme of things, on a universal scale, your guess is as good as mine. There is a school of thought that suggests ‘we’re here to get through this thing, whatever it is’ and it would seem that Betika are subtly promoting […]



Modest Mouse

We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank (Epic)

Is it just me, or are Modest Mouse become less and less modest with every release? With their second album they crafted one of the greatest moments of Nineties indie-rock; with their third they joined industry heavyweights Epic; with their fourth they reached platinum-selling status.



Nina Nastasia & Jim White

You Follow Me (Fat Cat)

Let’s get a couple of things clear from the start. Nina Nastasia is a fantastic singer, her voice soaring effortlessly alongside whichever instrument she chooses to accompany her



Nasty P

It Sounds Nicer When It’s Nasty! (KFM)

According to his PR Nasty P is ‘Edinburgh’s very own one man hip-hop institution’, which certainly marks him out as something unique.



Amp

All Of Yesterday Tomorrow (RROOPP)

The words ‘experimental music collective’ strike fear into the heart of every music reviewer.